Tag Archives: Dezert magazine

Micro-crystalline Azurite layered over Malachite

                      Old classic specimen of micro-crystalline Azurite layered over Malachite! Circa late 1880-1890s. From the Lavender Pit, Copper Queen Mine, Bisbee, Cochise County, Arizona. Measures 6.5 cm by 10.2 cm by 6.7 cm in total size. Ex. Robert Whitmore Collection  Read more at http://www.geologyin.com/2014/12/micro-crystalline-azurite-layered-over.html#dqRYFRK8vGrZzrJ4.99

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Why “Z” instead of “S”?

I wanted to take just a moment to explain why I have used a Z in our name instead of the standard “S”. Simply said, it’s respect, the original Desert magazine was an icon for Southwest publications and who am I to tread on their name. They deserve the respect that they have earned, for […]

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South Rides Again

There was another great western writer like Zane Grey and Louis L’Amour who featured areas of the Anza-Borrego desert in the setting for his novels. He was a writer who knew how to rivet the attention of the reader from the very first page of his novels. In the years that have passed, his name […]

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San Miguel’s Lost Treasures

  California’s mission San Miguel, located in San Luis Obispo County, has long been a popular tourist attraction. Founded in 1797 by Padre Fermin F. De Lausen, the mission represents a Queen Anne style architecture, pleasant grounds, and a colorful history. Like many histories, however, this one has some dark elements, one of which is […]

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Bum, SoCal’s First Canine Hero

In 1886 a steamship from San Francisco, the Santa Rosa, arrived in San Diego, and among those who got off the boat was a stowaway… a dog described as a St. Bernard-Spaniel mix. Someone began calling him “Bum” and the name stuck. He quickly adapted to life on land and made himself a member of […]

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Lost Treasure of Travertine Pt.

It was near the close of 1750 when a group of French and Spanish renegades headed north, after plundering silver and gold artifacts from churches in Mexico. But the local Indians were not willing to part with their treasures so easily, with each theft the group trailing the renegades got bigger and bigger. It was […]

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Mad Conquistadors Lost Gold

                There is a primal lesson that all people should learn in childhood. Treat people with respect….. If you don’t, it just might end up killing you. Unfortunately for a man named Don Juan, this lesson was tragically learned way too late. But for whatever reason, this lesson […]

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Mooney Falls, Az

Mooney Falls is the tallest falls located on the Havasupai reservation at 190′, but the trail can cause most people some anxiety. Visitors will have to walk through blasted out tunnels, use chain guides, steps that have been carved into the rock, and even climb down a ladder that was built in the late 1800’s. […]

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Henderson, Man of the Desert

By Phil Brigandi He was driven, demanding, and notoriously tight-fisted, he also built one of America’s great regional magazines. For more than two decades he gave his heart and soul to Desert Magazine, and his legion of followers survives to this day. Randall Henderson was born about as far away from the desert as you […]

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40 Mile Desert Route Nevada

There is an obscure memorial about a quarter mile off Highway 95, some fifteen miles north of Fallon, Nevada. Only a well-trained eye can decipher it through a sea of sage and rocks. It looks like nothing more than an odd shaped outcropping, or the remains of something long forgotten. After traversing the short dirt […]

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The Silver That Saved Nevada

                    If you had been in Nevada in 1900 you were probably there because your parents or grandparents came for the big mining rush to Virginia City some thirty years earlier. But in 1900 Nevada is not a land of excitement and far from a land […]

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Carvers Lost Ship of the Desert

  In May of 1964, Harold and Lucille Weight conducted an interview with a man named Elmer Carver, the man who knew exactly where the Lost Ship of the Desert was located… He is one of very few people to have actually seen and touched it. Elmer Carver was just a young 17-year-old boy trying […]

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Myths of US Camel Experiment

  This article is courtesy of Doug Baum Perhaps no episode in American history is less understood and poorly interpreted than the U.S. Army Camel Experiment of the mid-19th century. It’s even been written that it “failed.” Reasons our country has no vestigial camel populations from the colorful period preceding the Civil War are many, […]

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Randsburg Ca., A Living Ghost Town

Randsburg or Rand Camp, is just about a mile off of Hwy 395, 17 miles south of Ridgecrest and north of Kramer Junction. The town began in April 1895 when three miners, F.M. Mooers, John Singleton and Charles Burcham, located gold on a yet unnamed mountain, and quietly staked their claim. But like most new […]

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Lost Bells of Santa Ysabel Ca.

             A piece of a missing mission bell, more than two centuries old, is back where it belongs, thanks to history sleuth Kathleen R. Frazee. Fascinated by the mystery of the missing bells of Santa Ysabel, an asistencia (or sub-mission) of Mission San Diego de Alcalá, Frazee, a staff member in the Center for […]

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