Category Archives: Travel

When Lines Were Crossed

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  This story originally appeared in a past issue of Dezert magazine It was in January of 2013 that Joshua Tree resident Tom O’Key discovered a baited and set bobcat trap as it sat camouflaged beneath a jojoba shrub on his private property. Within 24 hours the wheels were set in motion and a sleeping […]

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Ragsdale Cabin, Santa Rosa Mt. Ca.

Desert Steve Ragsdale, the founder of Desert Center, decided that he needed a cooler place to be, in order to beat the scorching summer heat of the California desert. So in 1938, Steve along with his wife Lydia, purchased 280 acres atop the Santa Rosa mountain from local pioneer, Arthur Nightingale. First thing Steve did […]

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Sand Serpent Lives in the Borrego desert!

A big surprise awaits Borrego Valley visitors, even those who are “regulars” and know of the Sky Art metal sculptures will have something to talk about when they see the 350-foot long, out of this world, sand serpent straddled across Borrego Springs Road. It has a head of a dragon, the body of a sea […]

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A Day at Cottonwood Springs

Walter Feller, the writer of this article, revisits the old Cottonwood Springs and sees what’s it like today. I began reading an article written by Walter Ford, published in the December, 1959 issue of the old Desert magazine titled, Cottonwood Springs. I really wasn’t sure where the place was, although there was a photo included […]

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Lonesome, the Faithful Friend

Along the Colorado River at a point called the Carrizo Boat-In Camp, lays a monument. The monument is it is an enigma, a large structure made of stones complete with flagpole and flag dedicated to a dog named Lonesome, one man’s best friend and desert companion. The hand carved epitaph reads: Hellow, Lonesome and I […]

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Picacho, the Golden Road

Picacho Road was once the dusty path to gold riches for over 150 years. Today, it is the main entrance to the 6,769-acre Picacho State Recreation Area, and provides access to the Bureau of Land Management’s Picacho Peak and Little Picacho Wildernesses, the inactive Picacho gold mine, and the Imperial National Wildlife Refuge along the […]

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Timelessness of Cathedral Valley

A light wind buffets as I walk toward the edge of the cliff and the scents of pinyon and juniper come together in the dry, clear desert air of Utah’s Capitol Reef National Park. Below spreads a large valley filled with seemingly impossible natural formations: huge formations of hard sandstone shaped by millennia of unimaginable […]

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Majorie Reed Desert Artist

Marjorie Reed is best known for her paintings of the stage stations and scenes along the Butterfield Overland Stage Route. Born in Springfield, Illinois in 1915, Reed’s family moved to southern California when she was twelve. Shortly afterward her father, Walter Reed, began working as a free lance graphic artist for Mission Engraving and Offset, […]

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Return of the Little Buffalo

American  bison once roamed the prairies in numbers so large it was said that a man could walk on the backs of the buffalo from horizon to horizon. The Lakota, the northernmost division of the Great Sioux Nation, refer to the animals as Ta-Tanka. Lakota and other Native American tribes killed only what they could […]

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Campo The Forgotten Gunfight

As Tiburcio Vasquez uttered the word “Pronto” on that March day in 1875, the trap door swung open and the leader of one of the most notorious gangs of bandidos the state of California has ever seen dropped from the gallows. The rope snapped his neck, putting an end to the life of the convicted […]

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Mooney Falls, Az

Mooney Falls is the tallest falls located on the Havasupai reservation at 190′, but the trail can cause most people some anxiety. Visitors will have to walk through blasted out tunnels, use chain guides, steps that have been carved into the rock, and even climb down a ladder that was built in the late 1800’s. […]

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Grandma Prisbey’s Village

Beginning construction in 1956 at age 60, and working until 1981, Tressa “Grandma” Prisbrey transformed her one-third acre rural lot into Bottle Village, a fantasyland of shrines, wishing wells, walkways, fountains, follies, plus 15 structures to house her collections – all made from found objects. The name “Bottle Village” comes from the structures themselves – made of […]

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Calvin Black’s Possum Trot

  In the early nineteen fifties, Ruby and Calvin Black opened up a small rock shop on the way to Calico in Yermo California, and called it the Possum Trot and Fantasy Doll Show. Odd name for a rock and mineral shop, but it succeeded in getting some people to stop and see what was […]

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40 Mile Desert Route Nevada

There is an obscure memorial about a quarter mile off Highway 95, some fifteen miles north of Fallon, Nevada. Only a well-trained eye can decipher it through a sea of sage and rocks. It looks like nothing more than an odd shaped outcropping, or the remains of something long forgotten. After traversing the short dirt […]

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Randsburg Ca., A Living Ghost Town

Randsburg or Rand Camp, is just about a mile off of Hwy 395, 17 miles south of Ridgecrest and north of Kramer Junction. The town began in April 1895 when three miners, F.M. Mooers, John Singleton and Charles Burcham, located gold on a yet unnamed mountain, and quietly staked their claim. But like most new […]

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